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How to: Weather your ARMOR in the "Oily / dirt" style

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Hey guys, here's a tutorial I created, based on weathering your armor with the "oil / dirt / sand" look that I started a topic on here:

http://forum.mepd.net/index.php?showtopic=7274

It uses 2 passes of paint, with pretty simple paint mixtures. It creates a great random looking quality.

I figured a written tutorial with pictures would be really long for the detail I wanted, and I was far too lazy to type that much, so I tried to take a crack at making a video tutorial instead. :)

Here's a separate tutorial for weathering boots (watch the armor weathering videos below first)

http://forum.mepd.net/index.php?showtopic=7289

Some info / materials / supplies before you start:

- I am using Liquitex "Burnt umber" acrylic paint and Amsterdam "black" and "warm grey (I prefer quality acrylic water based artists paints because the pigments and binders are much better than craft paints)

- I use the burnt umber straight out of the tube for the first pass

- the second pass of the "oil / dirt" color is achieved with about 70% burnt umber, 20% black, and 10% warm grey (approx.)

- I use natural sponges for the weathering and terry cloth rag (wet with water, then wring it ALL out before using)

- don't use wet sponges for weathering (this waters the paint down, reducing the adhesion)

Steps for brown:

- do the "burnt umber pass" first

- make sure to work the paint into the nooks and crannies

- let dry for 5 minutes or so

- use twisting and dabbing motions with damp rag to remove paint

- once you are happy with the brown, let it dry overnight (important)

Steps for "oil colored / black" paint mixture

- again, use the sponge to dab a light coat of the oil / black mixture

- let it dry for 5 mins

- remove most of the black with twisting / dabbing motions to reveal some of the brown

- concentrate on removing most of the black, especially in high spots

- make sure weathering is consistent on both boots and consistent with armor

Part 1: research, prep, supplies and materials required, etc.

Part 2: Burnt umber (brown) first pass

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Part 3: Removing the burnt umber via damp terry cloth towel (twisting and dabbing to remove paint)

Part 4: Applying and removing the "oil / black" layer

Let me know what you guys think of the video tutorial format. I hope you find this helpful.

T.

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really cool to see you in action :)

thanks for these video it is easier to understand the method that you use, and video is just perfect for this.

weathering effect is really amazing.

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Glad you like it guys! Once you get the hang of it, it goes pretty quick. I weathered both shoulder bells, biceps and forearms for the second "oil / black paint" pass in about 20 minutes, including paint application and removal. The whole suit doesn't take too long.

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Cool video take Terry.

You give a very good picture here, how it shall be done.

Top work ;)

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Fantastic tutorial, Terry! This will really help me (when I finally get to it :blink: ).

(Man, it's REALLY loading slowly--I think the MEPD is about to crash YouTube!)

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This is great!

I do it almost like that, including the dry natural sponges. But I can see a couple of things I was doing wrong, starting by using to many colors.

I will think about redoing the weathering in the near future.

Great tutorials bro.

One question thought. Why not using just one color in different layers and concentrations?

What do you think about that?

Could it work?

Saludos.

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Thanks Juan. Yes, I think that's what Rolf does, a one color pass. The reason I used 2 colors is that I feel it adds more depth, and there are parts that really look like oil, dirt and sand has worn the armor. I really wanted to replicate the sample I created using "real" oil, but simulated with acrylic.

I did some tests using just one color and a few passes, but I felt it was the same color just lighter and darker. This technique with 2 layers adds a "real world" look to it. I wish you could see it in person! But really, you can modify this technique with however many colors or passes as you wish to achieve the look you want. Some people like the 4 color look with multiple passes, some like the one color look. Really, you can achieve it so many ways - this is just my way to achieve one particular look.

I'll be taking some high resolution pictures in the next few days, as my armor weathering is complete now. I think the photos will capture the detail much better than the video. I think that will give you a better idea of the results from this weathering style.

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Thanks Juan. Yes, I think that's what Rolf does, a one color pass. The reason I used 2 colors is that I feel it adds more depth, and there are parts that really look like oil, dirt and sand has worn the armor. I really wanted to replicate the sample I created using "real" oil, but simulated with acrylic.

Yeah last time i only used one mixed color.

A woodland series weathering brand.

I mixed Raw Umber, whit Concrete.

I will do that again, maybe use a little clean concrete here and there too.

But i guess not more then around two colors, just like you say here bro.

Once again, good work as all was Terry :)

Here a pics of my last TE2 sandy, whit only one color weathering on:

Posted Image

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Now available for every trooper, the perfect weathering tutorial!!

Really great that you've done this Terry :duim:

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Awesome video tutorial!!!!!!!! Thank you so much !!!!!!!

Leo

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Hi Terry,

Absolutely love your technique on weathering a TD! Will definitely use your method for my TK converting to TD.

My TK now is super shiny due to all the polishing previously. My question is, should i spray a layer of Matt surface coat on it before your weathering technique? Or do i do it after the weathering so that the whole armor looks more desert-like instead of TK shiny-like?

Appreciate if you can give me some advice on this. Thanks in-advance! :D

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Hey guys, here's a tutorial I created, based on weathering your armor with the "oil / dirt / sand" look that I started a topic on here:

http://forum.mepd.net/index.php?showtopic=7274

It uses 2 passes of paint, with pretty simple paint mixtures. It creates a great random looking quality.

I figured a written tutorial with pictures would be really long for the detail I wanted, and I was far too lazy to type that much, so I tried to take a crack at making a video tutorial instead. :)

Here's a separate tutorial for weathering boots (watch the armor weathering videos below first)

http://forum.mepd.net/index.php?showtopic=7289

Some info / materials / supplies before you start:

- I am using Liquitex "Burnt umber" acrylic paint and Amsterdam "black" and "warm grey (I prefer quality acrylic water based artists paints because the pigments and binders are much better than craft paints)

- I use the burnt umber straight out of the tube for the first pass

- the second pass of the "oil / dirt" color is achieved with about 70% burnt umber, 20% black, and 10% warm grey (approx.)

- I use natural sponges for the weathering and terry cloth rag (wet with water, then wring it ALL out before using)

- don't use wet sponges for weathering (this waters the paint down, reducing the adhesion)

Steps for brown:

- do the "burnt umber pass" first

- make sure to work the paint into the nooks and crannies

- let dry for 5 minutes or so

- use twisting and dabbing motions with damp rag to remove paint

- once you are happy with the brown, let it dry overnight (important)

Steps for "oil colored / black" paint mixture

- again, use the sponge to dab a light coat of the oil / black mixture

- let it dry for 5 mins

- remove most of the black with twisting / dabbing motions to reveal some of the brown

- concentrate on removing most of the black, especially in high spots

- make sure weathering is consistent on both boots and consistent with armor

Part 1: research, prep, supplies and materials required, etc.

Part 2: Burnt umber (brown) first pass

awesome tutorial yet again terry! B) ...and, a real inspiration for me to go for the 1 pigment "oily look" on my recent swat project! thanx so much again bro! B):)

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Glad the tutorial is helpful.

Hawk eye: mine was HIPs plastic but the same technique will work for ABS. My suggestion would be to wash the armor with dish detergent / rinse / dry first before weathering. This will remove any oils and wax and the paint will stick better. Make sure to use quality artist acrylic.

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Using paints is a good style to weather too, but I like the more...well..."real" way of doing it. Throwing dust on it. Actually it doesn't really matter. Looks good Terry! :P

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It's February 2012. This video still rocks !

:salute: hahaha... rock on!!!

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Hey there,

I'm still on doing research and building my backpack (WIP Thread will follow) and your color pattern / weathering technique is just the look I was looking for. A fellow garrisson member told me about this mixture that was more oil colored than the lightbrown/yellow color sand would have.

This is the tutorial I'm gonna use to convert my TK to TD I guess. 2 questions though:

I might not find the exact same oaint here in germany, do you think drying / resting times might differ even though I use the same quality water based paints ?

And is that natural sponge dry or wet ?

Thanks in advance !

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